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#1 chikin

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 10:15 AM

yes the topic everyone knows a little about but no one wants to talk about! I have been very unfortunate to have know been exposed twice. I had it cleared up for over 2 years and have since purchased a new kitten who although when i picked him up had no signs of ringworm within 3 days had 2 leisions on her. I am after whatever hints that anyone can give me. we have tried the tablets from the vets, natural remidies, separating them from everyone and yet still it went on and on. I would like to avoid the transfer from one to the other this time.and i am also very upset that i have purchased another cat that obviously has been exposed to ringworm and now i am stuck with the bills and hassels that come with treating it. :angry:

#2 KARENT

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 07:07 PM

You poor thing, i had one kitten come in to me with ringworm and tryed everything but nothing helped UNTIL someone told me about sporanox it is a person med and you sprinke 1/4 of a cap on there food for 3 weeks and spray with lamisil every second day it is well worth the cost aprox $60 for 15 caps.I have never had it again. Hope this helps.

#3 bengals aust chris

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 07:56 PM

I would purchase some F10 $19.25 for 200 ml, but it's very good

#4 Heather Sharada

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 10:41 PM

Explain what you do with it Chris.

#5 chikin

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 11:54 PM

WHERE CAN I GET IT FROM AND HOW DOES IT WORK

#6 mrs_palmie

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 11:55 AM

I have great sympathy for you as I have just been through this myself. Unfortunately, even following my vets advice to the letter, it has taken 3 months to clear it up.... and my vet told me that this was not unusual, it is very difficult to shift. Sporonox is highly recommended as we saw results from this soon after we started using it. You will need to see your vet as it is a prescription only medication. I would recommend you ask if your vet is willing to write you a prescription and you can then have it made up by a compound chemist in a suspension (liquid) form. It Can work out cheaper and easier to administer than the capsule form. I had the liquid form that I had my vet order in (human medication), but have since found out I could have saved myself a great deal of money by getting it made up by a compound chemist. Lamasil/Canestan creams applied to the affected areas are also good and should be used in conjuction with the sporanox. Also Malaseb shampoo dabbed onto the lesions and left for 5 - 10 mins and then rinsed off helps. If you have a long/semilong haired kitty, clipping the hair on and around the lesions can help the topical treatments work better. Please keep your infected kitties confined as they can spread the spores throughout your home and they can infect you and your family and of course other pets. Hope this helps.
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#7 Shamuneko

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 12:23 PM

Im sorry to hear about your bout of ringworm. From what I've read Mrs_palmie is right with what she has suggested. Heather I spray F10 around my house in a spray bottle once a week and after shows i re spray, clean all carry cages and bath my cats. Im a little over cautious but i think the effort now is better in the long term.

#8 jemappelle

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 01:08 PM

I am one of the lucky ones that has had ringworm bought into the cattery - twice in 11 years. The first time it took about 3 months to clear up as most of the cats had small lesions before I knew what the problem was. That time I used Imaverol dip and griseolvin as prescribed by the vet. The second time I used the lyme sulphur dip as recommended by a Queensland breeder. It was a cheap and very effective alternative. The 3 affected cats were clear of lesions in two weeks without oral medication. You need to treat every cat in your cattery. It is smelly and the cats turn yellow for a few days but it worked for me! I also cleaned the catteries thoroughly (with a bleach solution), changed bedding and litter trays on the days I dipped the cats. For kittens I bathed them in Malaseb and it is important to use a sponge when using the Malaseb as it is the foam that treats the ringworm. Good luck, I can empathise with you.

#9 bengals aust chris

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 01:47 PM

Basic facts F10SC Veterinary Disinfectant is a total spectrum disinfectant that is registered by the APVMA (nr. 54149) and is available for use in the veterinary/animal housing/ commercial farming markets in Australia. It is also approved as a TGA Hospital Grade Disinfectant, has an AQIS IOA for use in food export manufacturing plants, and is registered by NZ & UK MAF. The product has been successfully used in the South African, Middle Eastern and UK veterinary markets for a variety of uses including control of specific outbreaks such as kennel cough and Canine Parvovirus, and also as part of general pathogen control programs. In Australia we supply most of the animal welfare organisations here in Victoria with excellent results, including RSPCA, Victorian Animal Aid Trust, Australian Animal Protection Society, Lost Dogs Home, Guide Dogs Vic and the Blue Cross. Interstate we supply the RSPCA NSW, ACT, NT and most recently QLD, as well as various other animal welfare groups. Through our veterinary distributor, Lyppard, we also supply numerous vet clinics throughout Australia, where F10SC has rapidly become their largest selling disinfectant. The reasons for this success are as follows: Benefits What sets F10SC Veterinary Disinfectant apart from other "strong" disinfectants on the market is its combination of total spectrum microbial kill and the unmatched safety of the product itself in terms of not adversely affecting humans or animals. A few good examples of this are shown in the papers attached, including fogging in animal hospitals with kennel cough, and nebulization of birds with respiratory diseases (not really relevent but unique, interesting and demonstrates the safety of the product very well). Apart from the superior safety aspect, other benefits of using F10SC Veterinary Disinfectant include: APVMA, TGA and AQIS approved product - so you know all claims are genuine, proven efficacy and safety Total spectrum of kill – bactericidal, virucidal, fungicidal, sporicidal, tuberculocidal - will kill Canine parvovirus at 1:125 Rapid speed of kill – 30 secs Gram +ve bacteria and 60 secs Gram -ve bacteria at a 1:500 dilution Unique chemical compound based on biguanide/quaternary ammonium actives combination - less chance of resistance build up than with a single active ingredient Cost effective - usage cost varies from 6c to 49c per diluted litre depending on concentration used. Non-corrosive, non-toxic, non-tainting, non-irritating, totally safe to handle and not hazardous Biodegradable and given an EU Ecological rating of "zero hazard" (so suitable for septic systems too) Highly effective at low concentrations No rinse off required after use - just apply and leave to dry Proven in a wide range of different veterinary situations, from clinics and hospitals to farming solutions and even direct animal treatment. From terminal and routine disinfection, to footbaths and hand-washes, our full product range covers all veterinary, farming and disease control cleaning, disinfecting and personal hygiene requirements. As such, F10SC Veterinary Disinfectant is an ideal product for any animal housing cleaning and disease control program. To ensure we offer more than just a great product range, we provide specific cleaning and disinfecting guidelines free of charge to all of our clients, and also offer a range of chemical blending equipment to make dilution more accurate and simpler for the staff. Any one wanting it just email me :wink: :wink:

#10 mrs_palmie

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 03:21 PM

Chris - is it safe to use on carpets and soft furnishings? I have some but have only used it so far on hard surfaces.
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#11 bengals aust chris

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 05:11 PM

Amanda, I use it all the time when I come back from the cat shows :angelic: It's not worth the risk of getting ringworm, as there has been so much of it in Victoria this year, some vets ran out of medication to treat the ringworm according to Jim, my Vet :sad:

#12 mrs_palmie

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 05:19 PM

Oh okay... what strength do you make it up to?
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#13 chikin

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 10:53 PM

THANKS EVERYONE I KNEW I WASNT THE ONLY ONE OUT THERE WITH THIS PROBLEM AND AS I HAVE KIDS I WANT IT DELT WITH SO MY KIDS CAN FINALLY ENJOY THEIR NEW PET. MY BABY DOES SEEM TO GET A REACTION FROM THE LAMISIL THOUGH SO I DONT KNOW WHAT TO PUT ON THE LEISIONS . ANY SUGESTIONS

#14 mrs_palmie

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 09:25 AM

How about Canestan cream?
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#15 Shamuneko

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 09:49 AM

Hello, I had a look in my medicine book and it says you can put lemon juice on them once a day which kills the fungis as it cant breath. Not sure if it works though

#16 mybengal

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 08:41 PM

I have this problem as well, just take a look at the cw forums :) We are in the early stages and like you I would like a quick solution as not only do I have a toddler and another adult cat bnut am pregnant with twins, so this is something that couldn't be timed worse. Atm, we are spot treating the lesions with the malaseb as the kitten that has been infected *hates* being bathed, we are also applying a topical cream with miconazole twice daily and just keeping their area very clean. My vet has so far refused any oral treatments due to the side affects. Maybe we should all gte together and start a *ringworm* support group as there seems to be plenty of us about atm ;)

#17 jemappelle

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 09:02 PM

The problem that I found with just treating the spots is that others are "festering" and will grab hold before you realise they are there. I really think you need to treat the whole cat with a bath or dip. Plus you need to treat all pets in the house at the same time or they will keep infecting each other unless you can keep them totally separate and have appropriate barrier techniques with clothing, shoes, gloves etc.

#18 chikin

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 10:14 PM

my baby seems to be very sensative to the creams and ends up screaming when i put them on and goes very red.still having baths although not happy about it. i am having trouble with the breeder now not taking responsability for the ringworm and as i only had my baby for 3 days know that it had to have been exposed before ihe left the breeder.all i can say is i hope her 3 pregnant queens dont pass it on to their babes. and i agree a support group would be great as this is doing my head in big time.lol.

#19 bengals aust chris

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 12:26 PM

It's on the bottle :lol:

#20 mybengal

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 11:34 AM

Well, any tips on bathing? i would prefer to bath as like you said, it would do the entire body and nothing would get missed but when i tried to bath him, he went berserk and thats putting it mildly. Btw, the ring has dissappeared around the grey bit, is this an improvement?

#21 jemappelle

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 11:38 AM

I never put my cats in water but I know a lot of people do. I stand them on an upside down crate in the laundry tub so that they can see out. I then use a shower attachment to wet them, lather them up and then just rinse them off. I hold them firmly around the top of the front legs but a lot of mine just stand there and purr! The only time they might squirm is when the water is running. Hope this helps!

#22 mybengal

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 06:38 PM

Ok, i will give that method a try as well.

#23 chikin

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 12:43 PM

my baby is now bald from head to tail . no fur, completely naked. but still so cute . there seems to be no visable leisions, i have stopped all creams and i am using emu oil to moisturise the skin and of cause still using sporonox. no one else in the family,(2 or 4 legged) has any signs and i hoping it stays that way.so i will be ordering that f10. thanks to all for your advise i will update you on our progress.

#24 sumibo

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Posted 12 November 2005 - 01:20 PM

Hi I had a prob after takin a cat to a stud for a mating a long while ago, THIS is why i now have my own Stud - Thank goodnes this has all gone now hopefully forever. I found a article on the net so if anyone is interested i can send it as im not sure how to post it as a word doc on here I work in a doctors also, Ringworm sounds worse than it really is, and yes i agree a pain in the arse , and i was lucky it didnt spread to all the cats But most animals and us humans harber it because its a skin fungas and i guess when some are a little stressed it seems to break out ie going to new homes etc, i may be wrong but thats my theory, maybe when we get new kittens or cats from elsewhere we should give them a bath with solution or something ??? A NEW AND EFFECTIVE TREATMENT FOR FUNGAL SKIN INFECTIONS. Sydney, Australia. One of our Queens developed patchy hair loss soon after giving birth to her litter- a time of stress; This seemed to be fungal but would not respond to any of the antifungal creams or washes our vet suggested. Working together with another breeder and using all the common antifungal creams and a long course of oral griseofulvin all without success, the vet cultured the fungus - which took six weeks - and it turned out to be TRICHOPHYTON TONSERANS. This fungus causes ringworm on cattle most commonly - the vet had NEVER seen it before on cats. I knew of the relatively new and expensive human drug LAMISIL, which is used for treating deep seated tinea infections especially fungal infections of toenails and fingernails. It is specifically effective for the class of fungal infections called dermatophytes - an example of which are various types of trichophytons including t. tonserans. After doing considerable research with the aid of the research office at the drug company, we established that the drug had not been used extensively on animals, though it had been tested on guineapigs to establish its safety profile. There was one recorded case where it had been used successfully on an OSTRICH with a dermatophyte fungal infection!!! Lamisil is a very safe drug with few side effects if used correctly, as with all drugs. Lamisil comes in tablets only, much too strong for cats, but with the help of the research officer we worked out a way of turning it into a liquid suspension. We brought 20 tablets for $A128.00 , each tablet is enough to treat an average size female cat (3kg) for 2 weeks and the treatment needs to be continued for 4 weeks to ensure cure. 30 days later… voila! Our incurable fungal hair loss problem was cured!! Lamisil is available from all pharmacies, you may need a script from your vet. It is only likely to be effective for fungal infections (eg ringworm) caused by dermatophytes, eg tinea. It is not effective for thrush (candida albicans) To make the Lamisil tablet into a suspension - crush 1 tablet in a pill crusher (from the pharmacy) Dissolve in 3-4mls of pure ethanol (alcohol- buy a little bottle from the chemist) Add about 46mls of water to make 50mls of suspension Keep it in a tightly closed bottle in the fridge. The dose of the suspension is 1ml/kg of bodyweight given once daily. Eg. 3mls/day for a 3kg cat, 4mls/day for a 4kg cat. It is safe to use in kittens down to 500grams. (dose 1/2 ml/day) and nursing mothers. I would only use it in pregnant Queens in very severe cases of dermatophyte caused fungal loss. Your vet may well have not heard of lamisil because it is a human drug and has not yet been marketed as a veterinary drug. However it is a safe and effective treatment, though expensive. It should only be used for dermatophyte funguses and you will need to get your vet to culture the fungus to check it is a dermatophyte before using it. (remember, it may take weeks to culture) Summary. Lamisil is a new human drug with an excellent safety profile, proven to be very effective in severe dermatophyte infections. If your cat has severe fungal (ringworm) hair loss and not responding to conventional treatments talk to your vet about it and show him/her this article. Lamisil is also available as a cream but is less effective for severe infections in this form.
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#25 chikin

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 07:55 PM

Thanks, everything seems to have settled down now and lets hope that there is not a next time but i have jotted it down for future fererence.

#26 Andeos

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 05:04 PM

I read a lot on the net about treating a cat with a lime sulphur dip against ringworms. I also read that such a solution is not registered in Australia. Can I just use the lime sulphur concentrate for horticultural use from Bunnings and dilute it down to 2%? Should be the same stuff...



#27 ChocolateDots

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 10:12 AM

I would consult a vet first Andeos




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