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Family Cat Bitten by Snake - Surviving without Anti-Venom


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#1 Kirsty

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 03:44 PM

Hello Everyone, I just wanted to share a story about our family cat who by some miraculous reason is still fighting after he was bitten by a snake at our home in the Blue Mountains, NSW. After trying to reasearch any other possible cases on the internet about cats surviving bites without the help of anti-venom and came up none the wiser, so I thought I would post our story to perhaps give some hope to others that may find themselves in the same position and can't afford the best care. On Thursday morning we found our 18 year old domestic shorthair cat lying on the back patio not moving with blood dripping from his neck. We took him straight to the vet who did blood tests and shaved his neck, confirmed that it had been a snake bite. Not knowing what sort of snake or how much venom had been injected, the vet asked whether we would proceed with the $1,300 anti-venom injection with no guarantees. Unfortunately not having a spare $1,300 lying around for an injection for our 18yo cat, the vet offered to give him an anti-body injection and said to just take him home. At first we didn't think he would last the night. His pupils were dilated, his breathing was shallow and he couldn't move. He just lied there. After doing much reading about snake bites to cats, we kept him rugged up in front of the heater to keep him warm and forced water into him with an eye dropper every half hour much to his disgust. After a long night, he still hadn't moved much and looked completely lifeless. Day two didn't get much better. The vet rang and said that she was surprised he got through the night. By late Friday arvo, after constant round the clock care, he began talking a little bit and moving around but kept falling over. We also started giving him sugared water (water with disovled sugar) as another vet had suggested to help with his kidney's. It is now day 4 of our ordeal and even though he may not be completely heeled, he is walking much better and eating little bits of diced chicken and his biscuits mushed with water like a runny paste. His pupils have returned back to normal and the bite marks are looking alot cleaner. We just hope that this gives hope to other cat owners. He is a fiesty tom cat and a fighter still battling. Hopefully he can overcome the venom completely and return to his normal self.

#2 kata

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 03:49 PM

:a: let's hope he pulls through keep us informed- any piccies?

#3 Kirsty

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 03:54 PM

Will upload some pics tonight.

#4 Muffy

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 05:07 PM

Best wishes for your boy. He certainly sounds like a fighter
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#5 catz rule!

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 06:30 PM

i know all about that. it happened to my boy, in fact it killed him too. He was wandering in a paddock, we went looking for him with a torch (It just went dark) and found him lying in the paddock. We took him back, under the light. He couldn't walk. He was shivering and looked in pain. I was so scared. We called the vet and they said to keep him warm and covered. We did that, but that next morning i kind of already knew the my boy would be dead and he was. We buried him in our backyard. I was devistated. But knew my boy was in pain and that now he wasn't, which was good. I hope all the best for your boy. Keep us updated. I don't want him to go like mine did. It sounds as if he will recover though. Give your boy hugs and kisses from me! :shy:
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#6 Heather Sharada

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:03 AM

Sounds promising - how is he now? Did he continue to progress.

#7 Kirsty

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:13 AM

UPDATE!!! Thanks for the well wishes everyone, it really helped. Thomas is back fighting fit. He made it through and is as strong as ever. The wounds on his neck are heeling well and he is moving around freely again. He is a survivor I tell you. The vets were very shocked. He is now house bound. No more risks to be taken. We took him outside once and he absolutely lost it and wouldn't stop hissing and spitting in the garden. He is happy though sleeping in front of the heater. 'Catz Rule!' i'm sorry for the loss of your boy to the snake. It is so horrible just watching and not being able to do anything. Thanks again.

#8 Heather Sharada

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Posted 30 June 2009 - 09:18 AM

Definitely a survivor - maybe he was lucky and only received a little venom from the bite....but for whatever reason I am very happy you still have him and now he is housebound.....far too elderly to be taking on snakes Anyway it must be soooo cold up there by now so he should be enjoying the inside comforts.

#9 MemphisMum

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 08:21 PM

its possible the bite he recieved was a 'warning' bite and not much venom was in it, but it was close enough to his brain and heart to have an effect. I'm glad to hear he pulled through; I don't know what I would have done if I'd been you!
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#10 Kiinks

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 11:46 PM

Hi guys, I know this was posted nearly two years ago, but if anyone comes across this trying to find something, maybe it will give them a bit of extra information and hope for their little one. I live in Adelaide, about 45min from the city centre and it's pretty bushy in my area, and we have had brown snakes in our yard before, so close to nearly biting one of my other cats once. Anyway, my cat Gigi, was acting strange when I got home Tuesday afternoon, she was fine in the morning and came in and slept in with me on my pillow. She was fine at first, but within half an hour was limp and couldn't move, and stopped breathing a few times. We took her to the Emergency Centre in Adelaide, 45min drive, she pooed all over my blanket in the car, and just got worse from then on. The vet didn't do any blood checks, she told us it was definitely a snake bite, and that antivenin would cost us $1400, and then hospitalisation could be another $1000 depending on how long her first stage recovery would be. But there were also risks because she could have an allergic reaction, but they could give her something to try and prevent that. I love my cat, but I just don't have that kinda spare cash lying around. So the vet gave her under the skin fluids, charged us a heck of a lot, and sent us on our way. I gave up my bed for her, and my blankets, gave her a hot water bottle, and let her rest. Waking up every 2 hours just to check on her to make sure she was okay, not overheated, not too cold and so on. Wednesday she didn't do much, except pee in the bed. Thursday she wasn't much better, and I called back the Emergency Centre asking what I should do about hydrating her. They told me she would need fluids that day, and at the latest Friday morning (she couldn't swallow as she was nearly completely paralyzed). And told me to call my local vet, and ask them to show me how to give her IV fluids so that I could administer them myself (knowing that I was low on funds and couldn't afford to take her in overnight for direct IV). I called 5 local vets, and only one of them was willing to show me how to do it. So I went in on Thursday afternoon, and the girls there were absolutely wonderful! They explained to me exactly how the venom was affecting her, and that she had an irregular heartbeat which was bad (they were truthful, and it felt like the other vet withheld some of the more unpleasant information, which is understandable, but I do want to know exactly what it happening and understand it all, it helps me deal with it). They showed me how to hook up a bag of Sodium Lactate IV fluids, what the bits and pieces were called, where to inject her, how to hold the skin and anything else I needed to know (also that she needed 200ml of fluids a day). They gave me extra bits and pieces to take home, and suggested a can of supplement food with necessary vitamins to help her immune system when she started eating (which was surprisingly cheap). I'm so glad that they gave me the IV bag and showed me how to do it, since I didn't have to worry about her getting dehydrated. And the fluid bag also has salts and sugars in it, and sugar is needed to help the kidney function and repair itself. By Friday I had managed to get Gigi to eat some food. She absolutely hated the supplement, and I had to mix it with tuna to encourage her to eat. She was having trouble, but she could definitely swallow now, which she couldn't do at all before, and left dribble marks all over my pillow! By Saturday she started walking, only taking 4-5 steps and then lying down for a bit. I went outside with her for a while (she's an outdoor kitty and loves it) and sat with her. She was eating okay by then (still disgusted by the supplement food) and drinking some cat's milk I bought for her as a treat. It's now Sunday night, and she spent most of the day outside. She still has a slight limp in her back left leg, but as much as I try I can not get her to sit still. She's even started hunting mice again, and just caught a mouse and ate it a few minutes ago. She's still got a way to go, as her heartbeat is still a little fast and pretty irregular, her breathing isn't quite right yet, and her muscles need to repair themselves. I'm actually very surprised she started walking and eating as soon as she did, as the vets said she could take up to another week before she started moving (the venom is still active in the system for about a week after they've been bitten). It must have been a warning bite, as neither of the vets could find a clear bite mark, but she is also a very fluffy cat, so if it was small it's easily missed, so there must not have been that much venom in her system. To sum it all up, I was in hysterics when she started acting the way she did, and was even more upset when I found out it was a snake bite and that there was nothing I could really do. I've been with her for nearly 10 years now and I couldn't bear the thought of losing her! I found very little online about caring for a cat with a snake bite, as everyone always says "Take it to a vet immediately"! This was the only forum I found, and I'm so glad your cat made it! If anyone comes on here looking for some suggestions, the main one would be KEEP THEM WARM! They can't regulate their own temperatures, and I found that when Gigi had rolled away from the hot water bottle, she was really cold and her breathing got worse. I was told that a cat's ideal temperature should be 37.5-38C. And also if you can, get some under the skin fluids if you can't afford hospitalisation. Depending on how much they inject, it can keep them hydrated for a maximum of 24 hours (is what I was told by the vet). Local vet visit isn't much, and most of them don't even charge you for fluids. Good luck to anyone in a similar situation. Just make sure you give them lots of love and keep your hopes up! A lot of cat's do well, and I know it's horrible seeing them paralyzed, but they do have a strong chance! I'm not an expert or anything, I'm just passing on what I learnt from my experience, and what I was told by vets, in the hope that it gives anyone else extra info and your kitty a better chance of survival. IPB Image

#11 Muffy

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 05:15 AM

Keep up the good work & lots of thoughts & cuddles for Gigi.
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#12 itsme

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 10:34 AM

I hope kitty pulls through. Praying that he does.

#13 jessie22

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 04:46 PM

My cat was bitten a few years ago by a snake , and just wanted to share my info on what i did that i believe help him to surive this horrible thing. So when i found my cat he was compley paralyzed the only thing he could move was his tail. Not knowing it was a snake bite i took him to the vet where they confirmed it was a snake bite. There was no guarantee that the care they had there for a snake bite would work as we didnt know how many hours ago he had got bitten , so thinking the worst that my cat would die at the vet i took him home after they gave him a pain relief injection. So i made up a bed for him an gave him 20mls of water every half and hour through the syringe thing the vet gave me . I did this throught the whole night but every couple of hours after midnight. He didnt wee for a good 24 hours after the snake bite . The next day he was still paralyzed , i did the same routine with the water as of the first day but gave him some pet milk also as he was not interested in eating at all . By the 3rd day he would have little bites of chicken but was too intrested in it, so gave him a bit more milk and did the water thing again . I took him back to the vet on the 4th day n the vet was amazed to see him alive as he was in a very bad condition when they first saw him . They gave him another pain relief injection and also an depoitory for him as he was really constipated . That didnt work that great so i fed him some pumkin i boiled up and mashed with some milk with the syringe thing. That really did help with his bowel movements. So still gave him water every hour and the milk also . An he was eating a bit more wet food that day The 5th day He still wasnt walkin at all, he could lift himself up a little but then would collapes . SO I would take him out side and hold him up and help him walk to help stretch his legs a bit . It took him over 2 weeks to be able to walk by himself . It was a very long and slow recovery. As of this day He cant jump up high like on fences any more as the Venom from the snake bite destory his muscles . But other than that he is in good health. I hope this little info helps anybody that turns to the internet serching for answer if this terrible thing happens to there cat.

#14 Heather Sharada

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 08:05 PM

This may turn out to be a very good help to anyone with the misfortune to have a cat (or dog) bitten by a snake...I remembered Vitamin C is recommended in snake bite and went looking for the info. "These natural remedies should be always available in your car or property or suburban home. (Snake Bit kit) If you are on a property and you have access to injectable use it OR the powder of VITAMIN C (give orally crushed or use the crystal Vit C added to some fluids) then administer this immediately every 15 mins. If you have or can get the Bach flowers Rescue Remedy or homeopathic Aconite 1M for shock, then give several drops every 5 minutes – orally or drops on top of head or body somewhere. This will calm animal and reduce shock (which shock along can be fatal)" This info came from the following link http://www.naturalpa...o-69-false.html My friend who is a pharmacist had her farm cat bitten by a snake and used the anti-venum serum and the Vit C and her cat did make a full recovery but it took a very long time....she is an elderly cat now but still likes to stalk rabbits. Wishing good luck to those whose cats are recovering from such a near miss and hoping they have plenty of the nine lives left.

#15 Analog6

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 07:02 AM

Most snake bites (90% I read in one snake handbook) are not 'envenomated' - in plain English it means they don't actually pump the venom through - there is some on the teeth but these bites are usually survivable. Fluids, warmth, rest and the Vitamin C are the indicated treatments, and as shown in this post they really work. The damages caused differ from snake to snake (species) but can include muscle destruction, brain damage and kidney failure, with heart failure also a big killer - probably from the shock response. The main thing is don't automatically go into panic mode MY CAT IS GOING TO DIE - it ain't necessarily so. Keep calm, wrap the cat, get some fluids into them and keep them quiet and warm.
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#16 motsys mum

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:44 PM

Hi cat lovers,my name is cass and Im new here.I have been reading your posts about snake bites trying to find any info about coughing after a snake bite,my little tabby motsy was bitten by a tiger snake last week,its been a long week and only today has she been able to lift her head,she is in the vets and fighting everyday,but now she is doing a strange gag/cough sound sometimes,has anyone heard anything like that?,My staffy was bitten by a king brown and suffered liver failure and epilepsy for years after it until he gave up 7 years later,so I am preparing myself for the longterm side effects my and the gag/cough is not something the vets can tell me they've heard of before so its worrying me,hope someone out there canhelp.thanku..motsys mum :c: :c: :c: :lol:

#17 Catsfriend

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 03:08 PM

QUOTE(Kirsty @ Jun 1 2009, 03:14 PM) [snapback]37600[/snapback]
.. Not knowing what sort of snake or how much venom had been injected, the vet asked whether we would proceed with the $1,300 anti-venom injection with no guarantees. Unfortunately not having a spare $1,300 lying around for an injection for our 18yo cat, the vet offered to give him an anti-body injection and said to just take him home... And leter, Kiinks writing: The vet didn't do any blood checks, she told us it was definitely a snake bite, and that antivenin would cost us $1400, and then hospitalisation could be another $1000 depending on how long her first stage recovery would be."
I just wonder how vets can justify so high prices for a dose of anti-venom!? Whenever there is a health problem with an animal mentioned in an online forum the first advice given is, go to the vet. As if we all were millionaires. I think such prices are a disgrace. To be prepared, I always have elastic bandages in my household and car. It makes sense to go to a wildlife park and watch a reptile show; the handles usually explain and/or show how such wraps are applied after snake bites. Such $20 bandages have already saved many lives!
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#18 Catsfriend

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 03:32 PM

double posting by mistake
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#19 fleabag

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 08:36 PM

Online forums can be open to all sorts of problems legally and it is ALWAYS best practice to seek vet advice ..whether the poster chooses to do that or not is up to them ..but I'd hate to give advice that resulted in an animal suffering.
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#20 jaspersmum

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 02:52 PM

Catsfriend Do you know how they make the anti venom? It is not something that is carried by every clinic and has a very short shelf life. Motsys mum You have received very good advice from other people on the forum

#21 fleabag

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 02:41 AM

QUOTE(Kitah @ Nov 15 2011, 07:48 PM) [snapback]42045[/snapback]
One of the things that frustrates me the most is when people accuse vets of not caring about animals, because they won't treat their pet. You make us the baddie? If we did that, all vets would be broke. So many clinics start out as having payment plans, accounts etc for clients- do you know why most stopped? losing too much money because noone pays! So don't blame the vets.
I agree ..part of pet ownership ( they own me!) is making sure I am able to provide the care they need , not just food and flea treatments but routine vet checks and the unexpected. I've found if I maintain a regular annual visit to my vet and prompt payment of same ..the emergency treatment is available because I have proven myself trustworthy ..if there is a cash flow issue and I deal with it immediately I've never been refused treatment.. I think the best option for most people is a credit card with an appropriate limit to your ability to pay kept specifically for pet related costs.
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#22 Catsfriend

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 07:06 AM

I agree, without a credit card or a special savings account for emergencies we would have been in dire straits ourselves a few times, too. Don't take me wrong: I appreciate very much the services our vets provide, and many times, they have even provided services to my animals even at no charge! Just yesterday, I brought seven kittens to my vet for vaccinations, and she charged me only for five, although she had thoroughly examined all seven and had prescribed medicine (eye ointment) for the other two. And I am charged half prices already anyway - but only because I have discussed the price issue with the boss of the clinic in the past and provided price comparisons to vets in the big cities. I am very happy and grateful that I was able to make such arrangements, and I have a very good relationship with my vets now. On the other hand: The fact that such discounts and additional free services are possible - with almost every vet, if you make the effort to negotiate - proves to me that, generally, vets charge a way-over-the-top profit margin from the average 'retail customer'. And in many cases, the result is that people are turned away and leave animals untreated. I wished every vet and every community would offer cheaper alternatives to people with very little money without even being asked, such as on presentation of a pensioner card. For example, I believe that also a vet nurse would be able to do a basic health check and give an injection. It doesn't necessarily need the highly qualified and expensive veterinary surgeon to do that, and cost could be significantly reduced by assigning simpler tasks to cheaper staff. I would also very much welcome cheap desexing programmes to be advertised in public media, not just by a sign in the vet's surgery - because most people who think that they cannot afford it anyway, will not even enter that practice to read it. As my price arrangements show, even half the normal prices or, in some cases, even a third of the normal prices still leaves some profit to the clinic - so why not offer these discounts to those people who need them most?
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#23 Catsfriend

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Posted 16 November 2011 - 08:49 PM

QUOTE(Kitah @ Nov 16 2011, 02:00 PM) [snapback]42054[/snapback]
.. this is what I have been TRAINED to do and spent thousands just to get my degree ($40,000+ just for the degree, let alone 5 years worth of accomodation, paying bills etc with no income so I can concentrate on study)... and then be downgraded and disregarded once I graduate and start working.
Kitah, I perfectly understand where you are coming from. In my industry it is exactly the same. For decades, professional translators have been trying to make company bosses understand how dangerous, and even fatal, it can be for their businesses, if they let their websites and contracts translate by their 'foreign language secretary'. Despite of all those protests and the passionate educational work done, secretaries with a bit of foreign language studies still translate a lot all over the world, and guess what: Some of their translations are not too bad at all! Especially if they only need to copy and regroup passages from some professionally done previous texts, or if they can ask a professional for help when specific problems occur. Most professional translators who have gone through many years of intense studies of applied linguistics (not just some language learning like those secretaries) will never admit it openly - but I do: At least half of the work that lands on my desk is so easy routine work that I can subcontract it to casual not fully qualified translators and I just proofread the results, which very often are impeccable. If the customers had known better and if they had requested a discount because of low difficulty or similarity to previously done work they could have had it done at half the price, easily, through my or any competitor's office. And that is exactly what I demand from my vets, too, and what almost all of them accept: To have simple routine work done at half the price. The only problem is that most people do not ask for the discount, but rather decide not to have the work done at all. Constantly reocurring surgeries such as desexing can be certainly learned quickly and done well by someone who hasn't learnt how to perform a brain or heart surgery, or who doesn't have great expertise in reading X-ray images. Such routine tasks do not need to be so expensive. Almost every time when I come to our local vet practice, there is some dog or other animal there who 'was bitten by a snake'; it seems to be the most frequent emergency in our region, and therefore I classify it as routine work. It may be different in big cities or other regions, but for our vets here it seems to be part of their everyday work. However, there is no question that many other, rarer and much more difficult surgeries do require a fully trained and experienced professional academic - and that such a specialist deserves the highest payment and our utmost respect. But that is a totally different situation. Good luck with your exams, Kitah, and please don't get frustrated! Being a vet has many very rewarding sides, and you will certainly earn a lot of gratitude and admiration - in addition to good money.
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#24 Catsfriend

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 07:32 AM

Kitah, I understand you are upset. Just as any professional translator gets upset when told, 'my secretary can do it, too', and will accuse the client of "screwed thinking" (i.e. total ignorance and disrespect for our profession) - that's why I quoted the above comparison. That's why I perfectly understand where you are coming from. It is a common point of view in about every profession, Kitah, but the general market will never adjust to the dream to have all such work done by professionals only and to pay the highest rates. Whether you like it or not, it remains a fact that it doesn't take a brain surgain to administer an injection or to drain an abscess. By the way, about every farmer in Australia will regularly castrate their male animals themselves, not only sheep but also their dogs and cats. I have never heard of anyone being sued and fined for that. What legal issues do you have in mind?
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#25 Albai

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 03:37 PM

Thank u so much for all your stories. I just buried my burmese cat today after a snake bite, Ive found him paralysed this morning took him to emergency hospital and like everyone says how expensive it was. It would cost me $5K for all the antivenom and treatment. I beg them if there is anyway i could treat him myself at home as im a full time mum and i don't work at all. They said its risky as he needs all the treatment bla bla bla, I shd have google and find out more how to treat my sick cat. It was really emotional for my kids and me as we had him for 2 years now. Since i don't hv that cash even though they said i can pay in 6 months instalment plan i still couldn't have that cash. Sadly after much consultation with my older kids we just have to put him down. I think I just killed him. In future if it happen again with his brother, I know what to do, I want to take that chances and look after him myself. Ive been spending for the past 4 hrs googling how to care for cat with snake bite and i found u guys. thanks so much. I was thinking to adopt another burmese cat as his playmate, i cant bear to see him lonely like that as he is very playful with his other brother. Thanks again for all yr input.
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#26 annie.w

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 10:51 PM

I know where you are coming from. My big British Blue Boy had same symptoms but we could not find the bite mark. He was so close to death. We came to the conclusion that the snake struck his thick fur and he has licked the venom. Sadly here in Tassie we were told that he required 2 anti venom's on separate occasions which are now $1000 each. Since the Vet could not find bite marks either there is another possibility which has same symptoms which is a poison caused by bad meat or dead carcass. We are on a farm and road kill is also near by most of the time. We left him at the vet on fluids and he made it through the night. The blood tests came back saying definite snake bite. Muscle tone is around 100 normally his was 22 thousand that is the damage to muscle. Due to him making it through the night on fluids and not having at least a spare $2500 that was all we could do. 4 nights in the vet on fluids and we have now got him home. He is eating mushy food and tiny amounts at a time. He is still wobbly and weak but going fine. As we left the vet another cat with the same symptoms came in. I was told by a snake catcher/handler that he has not known many cats to die from snake bite more dogs. Dont know how true that is.

#27 Shamrock D

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 12:25 PM

Howdy, We buried our REX this evening. We found him dead from an apparent rattlesnake bite. He was bitten on the left side of his body, nearest his belly, and had cleaned his own wound. REX was an outstanding barn cat and good friend. He will be sorely missed by the family and the horses he was in charge of for these past ten years. I do appreciate you, friends, and the posts we found here. I found them to be heartfelt and most educational. Thank you all for sharing your experiences.
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#28 Heather Sharada

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 07:23 PM

Oh dear I am sorry for your loss - I bet the horses will also miss your boy. RIP Rex - you did your best and are remembered with affection....hugs to those you leave behind. RattleSnakes sound formidable - the brown snakes here are the ones that I fear the most where animals are concerned - having lost an imported Shetland Sheepdog bitch and a horse that got bitten on the nose....he very likely trod on it.

#29 trish

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 06:41 PM

Hi Kirsty i have just read your story of your cat. It gives me hope that our gorgeous gumboots may be ok. She has all the main symptoms of a snake bite but i cannot find any puncture marks on her. I am just keeping her still and trying to give her regular amounts of water though she isnt taking very much. We also live in the country and at this time of the year money is alot tighter therefore making a sastrip to the vet an impossibility sadly. However i was inspired by your story. Thankyou and i hope your gorgeous old fella recovers very soon and returns to his old self. Thanks again Trish. this is a wonderful site. I also spent hours today surfing the net looking for information on caring for your puss at home after a snake bite and this is the best but one of the only places with the answers that i needed. Thankyou everyone. Now to just watch and wait and hope she pulls through. Trish.

#30 NachaLuva

NachaLuva

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 11:56 AM

Its very sad reading these stories of peoples loved pets dying from snake bite, or those who have been able to survive. Living in Oz (those in the US are similar), we have to deal with venomous snakes. It unfortunately is a part of life here, even in suburbia. Antivenene is not a cure all, I know several people who have been bitten & refused antivenene because of its side effects. It comes from horse blood & many people have a reaction to it, sometimes just as bad as the reaction to the venom itself! However, its still the best bet to save your cat or dog. The other thing is an IV to help the kidneys flush out the toxins. If this is not possible (location or finances) keep your cat in a quiet, temperature controlled area. Keep her warm & most important, keep other pets away & noise to a minimum...she needs all the help she can get & stress will make it so much tougher. Use a 1mm syringe to hydrate her, preferably with Vytrate or similar electrolyte fluids. In an emergency, you can even use a sports drink. Most of all, dont give up. Animals have remarkable recuperative powers if given some help...& some TLC, just be careful not to overdo it, they need rest.
Pets are for life, not just for Christmas




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